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Top 3+ Ways to Be Happier At Work

#1 - Connection

  • To yourself!
    • No one is happy all the time (that’s not human), but the more you’re in touch with your own emotions the better able  you are to ride the waves of your emotions, make the most of your happier emotions, and move through and beyond the more difficult ones.
    • Protip: For one week, schedule 3 emotional check-ins with yourself - it shouldn’t take more than 2-3 minutes at a time. Try doing this as you start your workday, take a midday break, and end your workday. 
    • If you want a paper or online tool to use for this, email me
  • To purpose! A sense of purpose is only as good as our connection to it. If you are focused on your purpose the way some people focus on goals, you’re probably all set here.
    • If you have been feeling like work just pays the bills, well, maybe it does - and there’s nothing wrong with that. You can explore on your own or with a manager how your work connects to the greater mission of the team...
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What's Up With the Great Resignation/Reshuffle/Upgrade?

It’s come up again: I was asked to explain why people are leaving their jobs. This client professes a deep belief in valuing their employees and the work they create, and they’ve been affected by the “great resignation” like so many others. 

There’s been a lot of suggestions lately to rename "The Great Resignation” - I’ve seen or heard: 

  • The Great Reshuffling
  • The Great Job Hop
  • The Great Upgrade 
  • and early on, The Turnover Tsunami

Personally, I like “The Great Upgrade” because it captures the fact that most who are changing jobs are doing so to find something better. I'm also hopeful that, as employers do things differently to attract and retain talent, perhaps our work experiences themselves and the many organizations we work for will also be upgraded.

Whatever you call it, millions of people have changed jobs over the past 18 months or so. At the same time, more women are dropping out of the workforce entirely,...

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Managing Conflict: A Leader's Guide

Even in the most close-knit teams, conflict happens. And in an ongoing pandemic, at a time when lots of people may be moving to new jobs and positions? New people joining a team that's been stressed? It can be hard to just get through the day - let alone know what to do when a dispute pops up! 

Leaders - whether you're formally a supervisor, division head, executive, or just someone people look to for guidance - set the tone of the group. Some of us do it well and easily! And even those of us who make it look SO easy can still fall flat on our faces when faced with a conflict. 

That's part of why I became a mediator: I wanted to learn how to handle conflict (and help others). Yes, I've learned some tips I use personally - though you should NEVER mediate something important to you, because you can't be impartial. 

So let's dive into some tips for leaders needing to handle a conflict on their team: 

  • Stay calm.
    • Sure, easier said than done in many cases -...
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Engaged Teams: How to End the Great Resignation At YOUR Company

*Updated 2/14/2022*

Recently I asked a group of people WHY they think the great resignation is happening.

The answer two of them gave was: unemployment benefits are more generous so people are choosing not to work, just get $$ mailed to them from the government.

This is FALSE.

First, unemployment benefits (at least federally) are back down to the bare minimum. And studies show that people receiving unemployment have trouble making basic ends meet - meaning, rent, mortgage, food.

This isn't a post to bash unemployment (though personally I'm all for a universal basic income to level the playing field - having shelter and enough food to maintain your health are basic human rights. /soapbox).

It's to make the point that, when millions of Americans month after month choose to quit their jobs without having another job set up, it means they are MISERABLE at work.

It's time for a reset.

First, let’s be real - the “great resignation” is not hype. And it’s not about...

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You manage people? Don't be the reason they leave!

Managing with Empathy

Think for a moment about your favorite manager or leader. Someone who was in charge in the organization you worked for, or work for today. What is it about them that makes them your favorite?

Odds are, what you love about them has far more to do with interpersonal skills than anything else. They listen to you. They care about you. They invest in you. They help you.

Managers who understand how to be human at work - how to empathize with fellow employees and direct reports - are far superior to managers who ignore or tamp down emotional connections.

There is little reason to trust a manager who refuses to become vulnerable and share something about themselves, and there is little reason to trust a manager who, when you’re feeling vulnerable, keeps their response business-like - or, let’s face it, robotic.

Managing with empathy can mean a lot of simple things; it comes down to being human.

How to Manage with Empathy

  • Ask someone how they’re...

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How to Manage Workplace Conflict

4 Keys to Manage Workplace Conflict: Curiosity, Kindness, Engagement, and Shared Purpose.

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End Workplace Conflict with These 4 Steps

As a mediator, and a former community/political organizer, I’ve learned a lot about conflict. I founded Chantilly Mediation and Facilitation because Americans spend more time working than doing anything else - and we deserve to be happy at work. Conflict, while inevitable among humans, can be handled in ways that actually increase happiness.

There are four keys to building a happier workplace, and every one of them will help your employees deal with conflict more productively.

 
  • Curiosity

  • Kindness

  • Engagement

  • Shared Purpose

Curiosity

Your mindset is always a choice: When you can, choose curiosity. Someone at work is in your face, or didn’t do something they’re supposed to, or did do something they are not supposed to do. Instead of focusing on blame or disappointment or the person, start asking questions: Why did they behave that way? What might make them do that? What might they be thinking or feeling that would lead them to do or say...

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